MapMyRun

MapMyRun’s “Why Are So Many Ultrarunners Vegan?”

MapMyRun recently published another stellar blog on ultrarunners and why so many of them seem to be vegan. Here is an excerpt:

“While not every ultrarunner is vegan, there seem to be an awful lot of high-mileage fanatics who opt for a plant-based lifestyle. While there aren’t any hard stats available, with veganism as a general nutrition trend on the rise, it’s not surprising more fitness buffs are testing the waters.

Some of the big names in ultrarunning vegan lifestyles include Scott Jurek, the ultrarunning vegan who rose to fame by winning nearly every ultra in America and being featured in the cult classic “Born to Run,” then finally writing his own book all about — you guessed it — his vegan diet. There’s also former pro Ironman athlete and endurance runner Brendan Brazier, who popularized his raw vegan style of eating with his book “The Thrive Diet,” and famed podcaster and ultra-endurance racer Rich Roll, who espouses the benefits of a plant-based lifestyle on his weekly show. But it’s not just the big names in ultra who’ve opted for a plant-based diet.”

To read the full article, click here.

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MapMyRun’s “Runners: Is One Side of Your Body Weaker Than the Other?”

As humans, we naturally have a dominant hand. This is the hand that we write with, shake hands, eat with, etc. But sometimes that can extend to other areas, like sports. More specifically, runners can have a dominant side, meaning that some runners have one strong side and one side that’s a bit weaker.

MapMyRun’s blog recently wrote an article on the topic.

Here’s an excerpt:

“If you’re a runner, hopefully you’re already wise to the advantages of doing regular strength workouts. But, while strength training is key for doing well in any activity, there’s a type that’s especially critical for runners: unilateral strength training.

According to Lauren Loberg, DPT, board-certified clinical orthopedic specialist with TRIA Orthopaedic, the top benefit of performing unilateral strength exercises — like single-leg squats and deadlifts — is you’re training your body to meet the demands of your sport. After all, running is a single-leg activity, so it only makes sense that you would benefit from moves that shore up your single-leg strength, stability and coordination.”

To read the full article, click here!

MapMyRun’s “3 Common Strength Training Mistakes Runners Make”

MapMyRun has another fantastic blog detailing some of the most common strength training mistakes runners make. As a runner (or an athlete in general), it’s important to remember that your body has a limit and you can not overwork that limit. If you are training too hard or too often, then you need to correct your regimen accordingly.

MapMyRun’s blog offers some advice on how to avoid those mistakes. Here’s an excerpt:

“Strength training is such a critical piece of a runner’s training that it shouldn’t be considered cross-training: It’s just how runners prepare to run fast.

When you consider the enormous benefits of lifting weights, it’s a no-brainer to include it as part of your training. Here is a short list of positive results:

  • Reduced likelihood of injuries
  • More power and strength
  • Higher levels of neuromuscular coordination
  • More mitochondria and a faster finishing kick
  • Better running economy”

To read the full article, click here!

MapMyRun’s “5 Core Exercises for Runners to Eliminate Back Pain”

As runners, working on your core is incredibly important. And MapMyRun, as usual, has a few more tips and tricks on how to work on your core in order to eliminate back pain. Here is an excerpt:

“Low back pain doesn’t discriminate. It affects 80% of people at some point in their lives, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. So it makes sense that runners (and other exercisers) are no stranger to back pain. A study published in January in the Journal of Biomechanics proposed that one culprit may be weak deep core muscles.

Researchers had 80 runners without low back pain run across a floor with sensors embedded in it to measure the force under runners’ feet as they ran. The runners also sported reflective markers so the scientists could see how different parts of their bodies moved as they ran.”

To read the full article, click here.

MapMyRun Workout Report: 2/21/18

Hey everyone! It’s been a long time since I’ve shared one of my weekly reports with you, but I’ve got some free time and I figured I would get back to it! Here is my workout report for 2/21/18:

Workout: Run
Date: Feb 21, 2018
Distance: 5.50 mi
Duration: 52:10

For more information on my run, click here!
http://www.mapmyrun.com/view_workout?w=2724557620

To view my profile and add me as a friend, click here!